A&M STUDIOS

SOURCES:
Photo of Larry Levine in Studio A is from the A&M Records promotional album Odyssey from Altec.
Some photos on this page originally appeared on A&M Records web site in 1996 and are copyrighted by and used with the permission of Stephen Barncard.

For Mr. Barncard's extensive information on the studio please visit A&M Recording Studios.

Equipment lists appeared on A&M Records web site in 1996 and in A West Coast Phenomenon the Studio That Charlie Built: Former A&M Studios, Hollywood: A state-of-the-art facility with a colorful past, and an emphasis on vintage technology by Mel Lambert, November 1997.

A&M STUDIO HISTORY

In April 1967 A&M Records began construction on its studios at its headquarters on the old Charlie Chaplin Studios at 1416 N. LaBrea Avenue in Hollywood, CA. There were two soundstages on the property. A&M kept the newer soundstage and turned the older one into its studio complex.

By late 1967, two of A&M's studios were in operation. Original plans called for only two studios but the artist roster grew enough that a third studio was added and opened in early 1968. Even the first versions of these studios were, according to Larry Levine, "developed to provide a creatively conducive atmosphere" with drapes, incandescent lighting, and specially selected chairs instead of the typical fluorescent lights and folding chairs. A&M also included moving ceilings to create different sonic moods. The original studio equipment was from 3M, Scully and the Holzer HAECO-CSG sound system. Howard Holzer also designed, built and installed the custom constructed recording and mixing consoles in each of the new studios. Tom "Beno" May started with Holzer and helped build the consoles. He became A&M Studios manager and director of operations.

HAECO was the acronym for Holzer Audio Engineering Company. CSG was Compatible Stereo Generator which collapsed stereo sound for monaural record players. Billboard reported that "the unit allows sound information to pass through from the right and left channels, but places a hold on the center channel information whose amplitude is doubled when it is combined into a single monaural source for radio broadcasting." Billboard also reported in January 1968 that A&M's first monaural single to use the system was by Lee Michaels and Claudine Longet would be first stereo use, however the singles by these artists released around that time were not marked as HAECO-CSG. The first records from A&M marked as HAECO were released starting in September 1968.

A&M Studios added mixing/cutting rooms and reverberation chambers in 1969.

The first A&M album with recording credit at A&M Studios was The Fool on the Hill by Sergio Mendes and Brasil '66.

Herb Alpert hired Larry Levine as the first engineer in 1967. Before joining A&M, Larry Levine was an engineer at Gold Star Studios, Alpert's preferred place to record. Alpert based the construction of A&M's Studio B on the Gold Star studio. While at Gold Star, Levine engineered sessions for A&M artists including the Tijuana Brass, Chris Montez, Brasil '66 and Ike and Tina Turner.

Alpert and Moss nurtured the studios and the engineers. Not only were fine acoustics a priority, only top recording engineers, mastering engineers and technical engineers graced the studios. The technicians built and refurbished equipment. In 1968, they hired Bernie Grundman as the chief mastering engineer. Grundman stayed at A&M until 1984 when he opened his own mastering studio. A&M album covers tell the evolution of recording at A&M from four-track to eight-track to 16-track to 32 then 48-track to digital mastering.

A&M told Billboard in 1970 that it had invested over $1M in three 16-track studios, two mastering rooms and three mixdown rooms.

Following are two photos from an A&M Studios ad in Billboard from late in 1977.
A&M Studios Photo 1977     A&M Studios Photo 1977

In 1985, Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss hired Shelly Yakus as A&M Records' chief engineer and VP of A&M Recording and Mastering Studios. One of his first responsibilities was to rebuild the studios. In 1995, at the end of his contract, Yakus told Billboard, "I really miss being in the control room. It's a chance to be creative in a different way, and it's most natural for me."

Ron Rutledge began working at A&M Studios on October 10, 1994. Rutledge continued working at the studios after the merger with Universal and the sale of the studios to The Henson Company.

By 1997, A&M Studios had a staff of 40 people supporting five studios with eight live chambers, a remix/mixdown suite and the Chaplin/A&M Soundstage. From the day it opened until it was closed by Universal Music Group in 1999, the term most often associated with A&M Studios was "world class."

Three examples of the equipment hint at the dedication to creating and maintaining a top recording facility. First is the Neve 4872 Console in Studio A. This was the last board built by Rupert Neve in 1978. It was originally owned by George Martin and AIR Studios and was installed at the Montseurrat facility. Alpert and Moss bought the Neve in 1986 and continued to enhance it until they sold A&M Records. The second is the classic microphone collection. There was a perfect choice to enhance the sound of any artist. Finally, A&M owned an extensive catalog of outboard equipment. Full lists of the mics and outboard gear appear on each studio's page and the Equipment page.

The engineering staff was a Who's Who of the best people in the field. Larry Levine, Henry Lewy, Ray Gerhardt and Dick Bogert came to the studios in 1967. Larry Marks and Bernie Grundman started with A&M in 1968. Levine as an engineer, Marks as a producer and Grundman founded A&M's Mastering Division and managed it until 1982 when he opened his own studio. Henry Lewy became a producer with A&M in 1970. Karl Bischof arrived in 1971 to design, redesign and maintain the equipment. Also in 1971, Tom (Beno) May, became the head of the Studios. All told, he would have more than 20 years experience in mastering. The second chief engineer was Tom May, Sr. His son, Tom "Beno" May also came to A&M and was known in his own right. Roger Young, Don Hahn, Roy DuNann, Tommy Vicari, Bruce Botnick, Bruce Swedian, Stewart Whitmore and Ron Rutledge who continued to manage the studios after the lot was sold to the Jim Henson Co....just a few of the many talented A&M Engineering Staff.

The A&M Studios were an immediate hit with the label's own artists. Although A&M allowed artists to record in any studio in the world, A&M, Ode, Dark Horse, I.R.S., Windham Hill and Word artists all recorded at A&M. Here are just a few names:

Joan Armatrading
Hoyt Axton
Burt Bacharach
Captain and Tennille
Cheech and Chong

Joe Cocker
Peter Frampton
Quincy Jones
Carole King
Ray Manzarek
Bill Medley

Billy Preston
Soundgarden
Cat Stevens
Supertramp
Rick Wakeman

Other A&M artists chose to record in studios other than A&M but had their work mastered in A&M Studios. When Windham Hill Records beecame an A&M affiliate, it asked that only Bernie Grundman master its recordings.

The studios were not only home to many A&M artists, they were rented by artists on other labels. More than 100 artists have albums noting they were recorded or mixed at A&M Studios. Among the most famous:

Paul Anka
Black Sabbath
George Burns
Richard Burton
Vicki Carr
Cher
Chicago
Phil Collins
Ray Coniff
The Doors
Ferrante and Teicher

Foreigner
George Harrison
KISS
John Lennon
Manhattan Transfer
Barry Manilow
Johnny Mathis
Randy Newman
Ozzy Osbourne
Pink Floyd
Lionel Ritchie

The Rolling Stones
Carly Simon
Bruce Springsteen
Buffie Saint Marie
Steely Dan
Barbra Streisand
The Supremes
Dionne Warwick
Andy Williams
Stevie Wonder
Neil Young

Billboard reported that Universal Music Group closed A&M Studios on October 2, 1999.

A&M STUDIOS STAFF

Thank you to all of the very talented members of the A&M Studios family.

If your name does not appear in the list below, please send an e-mail and let us include you in the credits. Photos for the A&M Family Photo Album are always welcome! When you write, please include the years you worked at A&M and your job title or the name of the department where you worked. This information is also used to validate your registration for our A&M Family artists and staff contact list.

A - F G - O P - Z
John Aguto
Roland Alvarez
Robert Appere
Austen Baier
Chad Bamford
Tom Banghart
Stephen Barncard
Pete Barth
Mike Baumgartner
Dick Bayne
Karl Bischoff
Roy Bittan
Chuck Blackburn
Phil Blackman
Dick Bogert
Denise Bohamed
Niko Bolas
Bob Borbonus
Bruce Botnick
Fred Bova
Chuck Britz
Ellen Burke
Dick Burns
Cary Butler
Milt Calice
Mark Carter
John Casino
Jim Cassell
Bart Chiate
David Chow
Roy Cicala
Hank Cicalo
Linda Clay
Dave Collins
James Conniff
Bryan Cook
Richard Cottrell
Perry Cunningham
Ken Dean
Robert de la Garza
Frank DeLuna
Marc Desisto
Michael Douglass
Derek DuNann
Roy DuNann
Bill Dooley
Cheryl Engels
Steve Escallier
Tom Eulberg
Benny Faccone
Joyce Facey
Michelle Forbes
Larry Forkner
Napolian Futrell
Andrew Garver
Ray Gerhardt
Karen Glaser
Greg Goldman
Ed Goodreau
Bernie Grundman
Mike Guzauski
Don Hahn
Mark Harvey
Efren Herrera
Jim Hobson
Bob Hodas
Howard Holzer
Joyce Howard
Jimmy Iovine
Dave Iveland
Robbie Jacobs
Rob Jaczko
Nick Jerrard
Andrew Johns
Glyn Johns
John Beverly Jones
Clyde Kaplan
Steve Katz
Bill Kennedy
Norm Kinney
Ed Korengo
Kathy Kurasch
Jewell Kumjian
Bill Lazarus
Larry Levine
Henry Lewy
Jonathan Little
Bito Mann
Gary Mannon
Steve Marcussen
Larry Marks
Tom May, Sr.
Tom "Beno" May
Caryl McGowan
Mark McKenna
Paul McKenna
Gail Miller
Herman Miller
Steve Mitchell
Eric Moore
Bill Morgan
Mike Morongell
Todd Montgomery
Pat Muprhy
Gary Myerberg-Lauter
Elizabeth Palmer
Thom Panunzio
Ken Perry
Denise Porter
Rick Porter
Dan Ray
Alex Reed
Brian Reeves
Joe Rodriguez
Pete Romano
Brian Ross-Myring
Ron Rutledge
Doug Sax
Brian Scheuble
Bill Schnee
Don Scott
Bruce Schaffer
Geoffrey Schulman
Karen Shane
Krish Sharma
John Sisti
Sandi Smart
Ellis Sorkin
Ed Stasium
Randy Staub
Patricia Sullivan
Bruce Swedien
Ed Thacker
David Tickle
James Tindle
Mark Tindle
Duane Tornquist
Chuck Trammel
Rob Trisler
Linda Tyler
Vincent van Haaff
Tommy Vicari
Bob Vogt
Tom Watson
Stewart Whitmore
Doug Wilson
Randy Wine
Howard Wolen
Ted Welty
Shelly Yakus
Alan Yoshida
Roger Young

A&M RECORDS STUDIO A

AIR MONTSERRAT CONSOLE

This console was one of the last three designed by Rupert Neve for the Neve Company. Producer Sir George Martin developed the specifications for the desks which were to be used in Air Studios. Engineer Geoff Emerick also added his specifications. This console got its name because it was installed in the Air Montserrat Studios. While at Air, it was used to record The Police albums Ghost in the Machine and Synchronicity.

In 1987, A&M Records bought the console.

The console featured 56 channels with:

  • 48 Remote Preamps in a 4 x 12 channel system
  • 44 x 31106 Eq
  • 8 x 1081
  • 4 x 32088 Eq's
  • 52 x 32436 Aux Routing Modules
  • 2 x 1974 Routing modules
  • Flying Faders
  • TT Patch Bay
  • remote-controlled microphone preamps and toroidal transformers,
  • integrated circuits

Studio A had tracking, overdub and remixing capabilities. Among the famous recordings to come from Studio A are:

  • "We Are the World" by USA for Africa
  • Herb Alpert remixed his Fandango album and recorded Blow Your Own Horn
  • Joan Baez's Diamonds and Rust album
  • Jeffrey Osborne's self titled album
  • Lani Hall's Es Facil Amar album was mixed in Studio A
  • Stan Getz's Apasionado

According to the defunct A&M Studios web site, artists entered Studio A through its control room. The control room was about 19' by 22'. (All dimensions are approximations because the studio complex contained many walls that were set on angles.) On the left side of the control room was a vocal ISO booth. Two more ISO booths were on the right side of the studio. One was about 16' by 20' and the other was 20' by 26'. The control room windows looked out into the main recording room with its 20' ceiling. The main area was about 38' by 39'.

STUDIO A EQUIPMENT

Console:

  • Custom Neve Model 4972 52/24/32 with
    44-31106 Modules and 08-1073 Modules
  • Flying Faders Automation

Tape Machines:

  • Two Studer A800 Multitracks
  • Studer A820
  • Ampex ATR-102 two-tracks
  • Two TimeLine Lynx synchronizers

Mixdown/Reference:

  • A&M proprietary A-to-D and D-to-A
    converters
  • Sony PCM-7010 Timecode DAT
  • Panasonic SV-3700 DAT
  • Phillips CD player
  • Tascom Model 122 Mk III cassettes

Main Monitors:

  • Custom A&M/Van Haaff systems with
    Pioneer/TAD components

Near Field Monitoring:

  • Yamaha NS-10Ms

Outboard Equipment:

  • Compressor/Limiter:
  • Fairchild 670
  • UREI LA-2a, LA-3 and 1176
  • dbx Model 160 and Model 160x
  • Neve 32264a
  •  
  • Equalizers:
  • Pultec EQP-1A3, EQP-1A and EQH-2
  • GML Model 8200
  •  
  • Reverb/Effects:
  • Eventide H-3500
  • Lexicon 480L, PCM-80 and PCM-70
  • AMS RMX-16
  • Yamaha 990, Rev 5, Rev 7 and SPX-90
  •  
  • Delays/Effects:
  • AMS DMX
  • Lexicon PCM-42
  • Roland SDE-3000 (with AES Trig.)
  • TC Electronics 2290
  • Eventide 949
  •  
  • Gates/Proc:
  • Drawmer DS-201 gates

A&M RECORDS STUDIO B

With tracking and overdub facilities, this is the studio Herb Alpert patterned after Gold Star. Studio B was accessed through an 18' by 19' control room. It had two small ISO booths, one on each side of the control room. The main recording room was 20' by 30'.

Carole King recorded her Tapestry and Music albums in A&M Studio B. Among other artists to mix albums in Studio B are Bruce Springsteen's Unplugged and Melissa Etheridge's self-titled album.

Karen and Richard Carpenter filmed their video of "Hurting Each Other" in Studio B.

Studio was completed by a private lounge and a very large crystal that Herb Alpert found.

STUDIO B EQUIPMENT

Console:

  • 56-channel, 112-input SSL SL 6056E with
    Total Recall and G-Series Automation

Tape Machines:

  • Studer A800 Multitracks
  • Studer A820
  • Ampex ATR-102 two-tracks
  • Two TimeLine Lynx synchronizers

Mixdown/Reference:

  • A&M proprietary A-to-D and D-to-A converters
  • Sony PCM-7010 Timecode DAT
  • Panasonic SV-3700 DAT
  • Phillips CD player
  • Tascom Model 122 Mk III cassettes

Main Monitors:

  • Custom A&M/Van Haaff systems with
    Pioneer/TAD components

Near Field Monitoring:

  • Yamaha NS-10Ms

Outboard Equipment:

  • Compressor/Limiter:
  • li> Fairchild 670
  • UREI LA-2a, LA-3 and 1176
  • dbx Model 160 and Model 160x
  • Neve 32264a
  •  
  • Mic Pre-ams/EQ:
  • Neve Model 1073 Modules
  • Pultec EQP-1A3, EQP-1A and EQH-2
  • GML Model 8200
  •  
  • Reverb/Effects:
  • Eventide H-3500
  • Lexicon 480L, PCM-80 and PCM-70
  • AMS RMX-16
  • Yamaha 990, Rev 5, Rev 7 and SPX-90
  •  
  • Delays/Effects:
  • AMS DMX
  • Lexicon PCM-42
  • Roland SDE-3000
  • TC Electronics 2290
  • Eventide 949
  •  
  • Gates/Proc:
  • Drawmer DS-201 gates
  • dbx Model 902 de-esser

A&M RECORDS STUDIO C

Studio C was the smallest with just a control room and main recording area measuring 14' by 21. It served as A&M's multichannel mixing and pre-mastering studio. Crosby, Stills and Nash used Studio C as did Dave Koz for his Off the Beaten Path album.

STUDIO C EQUIPMENT

Console:

  • 1996:
  • API 32 Input P&G Faders (modified)
  •  
  • 1997:
  • Euphonics CS-3000 digitally-controlled
  • analog console with Surround Sound
  • Panning

Tape Machines:

  • Studer A800 Multitracks
  • Studer A820 two-track
  • Two TimeLine Lynx synchronizers

Mixdown/Reference:

  • A&M proprietary A-to-D and D-to-A
  • converters
  • SVDA-10/FRED MOD DAT recorders
  • Phillips CD player
  • Tascom Model 122 Mk III cassettes

Main Monitors:

  • 1996:
  • Custom A&M/Augsperger system
  •  
  • 1997:
  • Custom A&M/baulton system

Outboard Equipment (1996):

  • Comp/Limiter:
  • Fairchild 670
  • UREI LA-2a, LA-3 and 1176
  • dbx Model 160 and Model 160x
  •  
  • Mic Pre-ams/EQ:
  • Neve Model 1066 Modules
  • Pultec EQP-1A3, EQP-1A and EQH-2
  • GML Model 8200
  •  
  • Delays/Effects:
  • AMS DMX
  • Lexicon PCM-42
  • Roland SDE-3000 (with AES Trig.)
  • T.C. Electronics 2290
  • Eventide 949
  •  
  • Gates/Proc:
  • Drawmer DS-201 gates
  • dbx Model 902 de-esser
  •  
  • Reverb/Effects:
  • Eventide H-3500
  • Lexicon 480L, PCM-80 and PCM-70
  • AMS RMX-16
  • Yamaha 990, Rev 5, Rev 7, SPX-90

STUDIO D

For the television show "Solid Gold," Studio D was used to produce tracks for Dionne Warwick, Frank Sinatra, Gladys Knight and the Pips, Roy Clark and Joe Piscopo.

Tracking and overdub capabilities. Enetered through a 20' by 21' control room, two isolation chambers were set off on the left side. The main recording room was 28.5' by 34' with an 18.5' ceiling. Behind the main room were two more ISO booths, one 14' by 18' and the other 16' by 18'. Studio D also had a private lounge and bath.

Carpenters filmed two of their videos in Studio D, "Only Yesterday" and "All You Get from Love Is a Love Song."

Studio D was chosen for the 3M multi-track tape machine installed February 6, 1979. Herb Alpert tested the new equipment when he recorded his Rise album in 1979. He also recorded his Magic Man album in D.


STUDIO D EQUIPMENT

Console:

  • 72-channel/144-input SSL SL 4072G
    with Total Recall, G Series
    Automation and E-Series EQ

Tape Machines:

  • Studer A800 Multitracks
  • Ampex ATR-1045 four-track
  • Studer A820 (1/4-inch)
  • Studer A820 (1/2-inch) two-tracks
  • Two TimeLine Lynx synchronizers

Mixdown/Reference:

  • A&M proprietary A-to-D and D-to-A
  •     converters
  • Sony PCM-7010 Timecode DAT
  • Panasonic SV-3700 DAT
  • Phillips CD player
  • Tascom Model 122 Mk III cassettes

Main Monitors:

  • Custom A&M/Augsperger system

Near-Field Monitoring:

  • Yamaha NS-10Ms

Outboard Equipment:

  • Comp/Limiter:
  • Fairchild 670
  • UREI LA-2a, LA-3 and 1176
  • dbx Model 160 and Model 160x
  •  
  • Mic Pre-ams/EQ:
  • Neve Model 1073 Modules
  • Pultec EQP-1A3, EQP-1A and EQH-2
  • GML Model 8200
  •  
  • Reverb/Effects:
  • Eventide H-3500
  • Lexicon 480L, PCM-80 and PCM-70
  • AMS RMX-16
  • Yamaha 990, Rev 5, Rev 7, SPX-90
  •  
  • Delays/Effects:
  • AMS DMX
  • Lexicon PCM-42
  • Roland SDE-3000 (with AES Trig.)
  • T.C. Electronics 2290
  • Eventide 949
  •  
  • Gates/Proc:
  • Drawmer DS-201 gates
  • dbx Model 902 de-esser
>

STUDIO H

Herb Alpert recorded My Abstract Heart here and Lani Hall used Studio H to record her vocals.

STUDIO M

M for Mixing, mixdown and remix in this dedicated suite. The control room measured 14' by 18' and its lounge/overdub booth was 9' by 10'.

STUDIO M EQUIPMENT

Console:

  • 72-channel/144-input SSL SL-6072E
    with Total Recall and G-Series Automation
  • Flying Faders Automation

Tape Machines:

  • Two Studer A800 Multitracks
  • Studer A820
  • Ampex ATR-102 two-tracks
  • Two TimeLine Lynx synchronizers

Mixdown/Reference:

  • A&M proprietary A-to-D and D-to-A converters
  • Sony PCM-7010 Timecode DAT
  • Panasonic SV-3700 DAT
  • Phillips CD player
  • Tascom Model 122 Mk III cassettes

Main Monitors:

  • Custom A&M/Augspurger systems

Near Field Monitoring:

  • Yamaha NS-10Ms

Outboard Equipment:

  • Compressor/Limiter:
  • Fairchild 670
  • UREI LA-2a, LA-3 and 1176
  • dbx Model 160 and Model 160x
  •  
  • Mic Pre-Amps/EQ:
  • Neve Model 1066 modules
  • Pultec EQP-1A3, EQP-1A and EQH-2
  • GML Model 8200
  •  
  • Reverb/Effects:
  • Eventide H-3500
  • Lexicon 480L, PCM-80 and PCM-70
  • AMS RMX-16
  • Yamaha 990, Rev 5, Rev 7 and SPX-90
  •  
  • Delays/Effects:
  • AMS DMX
  • Lexicon PCM-42
  • Roland SDE-3000
  • TC Electronics 2290
  • Eventide 949
  •  
  • Gates/Proc:
  • Drawmer DS-201 gates
  • dbx Model 902 de-esser

A&M SOUNDSTAGE/CHAPLIN SOUNDSTAGE

The size of the soundstage and its versatility lent it to be used for promotional films (the forerunner to music videos), television specials, large group recordings and tour rehearsals.

The first time the soundstage was seen on TV was in 1967 when the Tijuana Brass filmed part of its first television special there. Parts of all of the Brass specials were filmed on the soundstage.

Probably the most famous tour rehearsal held on the soundstage was Joe Cocker's Mad Dogs and Englishmen . In the early 1970s, George Harrison, Billy Preston and the Maharishi Orchestra rehearsed for their tour on the soundstage.

The soundstage was used for remote recording of large group projects. These included:

  • the quadrophonic version of Rick Wakeman's Journey to the Center of the Earth album;
  • Carpenters with the Overbudget Orchestra (Los Angeles Philharmonic) recorded "Don't Cry for Me Argentina" in front of an audience of music journalists in 1977.
  • In 1978, Herb Alpert and Hugh Masekela's The Main Event Live album .

Many A&M promotional films and music videos were shot on the soundstage. Among the promotional films are the earliest Carpenters performance videos. The videos include:

  • "Every Breath You Take" by The Police in June 1983,
  • Jeff Beck's "Ambitious" (1985),
  • Michael Jackson's "Liberian Girl" (1987)
  • Vital Signs "The Boys and Girls Are Doing It" from 1989
  • Weird Al Yankovic's "You Don't Love Me Anymore" (1992)

The soundstage also hosted countless listening parties for new A&M products as well as other events.

A&M STUDIOS MICROPHONES

5 AKG C12
1 AKG C24
2 AKG C28
1 AKG C28C
2 AKG C414
1 AKG C414B-ULS
5 AKG C414EB
1 AKG C451
7 AKG C451E
4 AKB C451EB
7 AKG C452EB
5 AKG C460B
1 AKG D1000E
1 AKG D112
2 AKG D12
1 AKG D124E
3 AKG D12E
1 AKG D140E
1 AKG D160E
1 AKG D190E
1 AKG D224E
1 AKG N12
2 AKG S10
1 AKG C451E
1 ALTEC 21-B
1 ALTEC 633A
1 ALTEC 633C
1 Audio Technica ATM31
1 Beyer M101
2 Beyer M160C
2 Beyer M160N
1 Beyer M201
1 Beyer M260MC
1 Beyer M88
1 Beyer MC740N
1 Beyer M88
1 Beyer MC740N
2 Bruel & Kjaer 404
2 Crown PCM-30GPG
1 E-V 1710
1 E-V 1711
1 E-V 1751
1 E-V 635A
1 E-V 666
1 E-V C090
1 E-V PL95
9 E-V RE 16
1 E-V RE 20
1 Milab VIP50
1 Milab XY82
1 Neumann HITLER MIC
1 Neumann KM54A
1 Neumann KM83
1 Neumann KM83i
2 Nuemann KN84
4 Neumann KM84i
3 Neumann KM86
2 Neumann KM86i
1 Neumann KMi
1 Neumann M249C
2 Meumann M250B
7 Neumann M269C
1 Neumann M49
1 Neumann M49B
1 Neumann SM69
6 Neumann TLM 170
3 Neumann U47
1 Neumann U47 FET
3 Neumann U47FET
2 Neumann U48
6 Neumann U67
21 Neumann U87
3 NORELCO C12A
4 RCA 44BX
7 RCA 77DX
2 RCA JR Velocity
13 Sennheiser MD 421
1 Sennheiser MD 421U-2
4 Sennheiser MD 441-U
1 Sennheiser MD421
7 Sennheiser MKH 405
1 Sennheiser MKH816
2 Shure 300
3 Shure 546
1 Shure SM33
1 Shure SM56
18 Shure SM57
3 Shure SM58
3 Shure SM7
2 Shure SM77
1 Shure SM98
2 Shure SM58
1 Sony 64P
2 Sony C 535-P
2 Sony C37A
4 Sony C37P
1 Sony C38
2 Sony C38B
1 Sony C500
1 Sony C535P
1 Sony C536P
2 Sony ECM-16
6 Sony ECM-22
2 Sony ECM-50
1 Telefunken 950EC
3 Telefunken ELA M251
2 U.I. Sound Dpt. Church Mic
2 Yamaha MZ204's

A&M STUDIOS OUTBOARD GEAR

CATEGORY MODEL
Digital Reverbs & Delays AMS DMX Digital Delay
Bel Electronics BD 240 Delay
EMT 250 Reverb
Eventide 1745 Delay
Eventide FL201 Instant Flanger
Eventide 949 Harmonizer
Eventide 910 Harmonizer
Eventide H3500 Effects Processor
Eventide H3000SE Effects Processor
EXR EX-4 Aural Exciter
Korg SDD-2000 Delay
Lexicon PCM-42 Delay
Lexicon 122 Digital
Marshall Time Modulator Delay
MXR Audio Flanger
Quad Eight RV 10 Reverb
Roland SDE-3000 Delay
Roland SDF-325 Flanger
SST Space Station 282 Analog Delay
TC Electronics 1210 Spatial Expander
Yamaha Rev 1 Reverb
Compressors/Limiters & Gates APA 521
DBX Model 160XT
Model 165a
Model 160 and 160x
Drawmer DS-201 Gate
Novonics 201
Neve 2254a and 32264
Teletronics LA2 and LA2a
UREI 1176
UREI LA2a
Valley People TR804
Valley People Gain Brains
Marc Electronics MX1
Neve Model 33609
Fairchild 670 and 660x comp/limiters
Other Signal Processors A&M Design eight-channel Direct Boxes
Aphex 4B1
BG Model 20 Crossover
Boulder Jensen Twin Servo Mic Pre-Amp
Dolby A301 and Dolby Labs 361 Noise Reduction
Dynaflex DX2 Noise Reduction
George Massenburg Mic Pre-Amp
Groove Tubes Guitar Pre-Amp
Palmer PDi-03 Speaker Simulator
Simon System RDB 400 Direct Injection
Sunrise Tube Interface Mic Pre-Amp
Systems TCB M10001 MIDI Controller
Universal Audio 565 Filter
UREI 962
963 and 964 Digital Metronomes
White Instruments 4400 third-octave Room EQ
White Instruments 4000 Room EQ
Wendel Labs Ltd. Wendel Jr. Sample Trigger
Equalizers/De-Essers Aphex Type B Aural Exciter
API 560 EQ
Lang PEQ 4 EQ
Neve racks of eight Model 1073 mic/fine EQ
Neve BCM 10 10-channel Console
NTI EQ-3 equalizer
Orban 621B and 622B Parametric EQ
Orban 536A and 526E De-essers
Pultec EQH-2 EQ
Pultec HLF-3C filter
Pultec EQP-1A3 Program EQ
Pulec 1A3 EQ
Pultec MEQ-5 Midrange EQ
Pultec EQP-1A EQ and UREI 527A Graphic EQ

ALBUMS RECORDED AT A&M STUDIOS

This table contains albums by artists signed to other labels who chose to record at A&M Studios.

To sort the table click on any column heading.

ALBUMS MIXED AND MASTERED AT A&M STUDIOS

This table contains albums by artists signed to other labels whose albums were mixed and/or mastered at A&M Studios.

To sort the table click on any column heading.

SOURCES

1. Equipment lists appeared on A&M Records web site in 1996 and in A West Coast Phenomenon the Studio That Charlie Built: Former A&M Studios, Hollywood: A state-of-the-art facility with a colorful past, and an emphasis on vintage technology by Mel Lambert, November 1997.
2. A&M Is Creating Sutdios in Tune with Creative Artists. Billboard, November 11, 1967.
3. 2 Studios of A&M Roll--3d Put in Gear. Billboard, December 21, 1968.
4. Former A&M Studios website. Stephen Barncard. October 25, 1996.
5. A&M Recording Studios by Stephen Barncard.
6. Photo of Herb Alpert, Howard Holzer and Jerry Moss courtesty of Susie Singer Carter.
7. Photo of Larry Levine in Studio A by A&M Records.

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